Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Soul Note & Black Saint - Catalogue available for download

For once not a review, but an announcement.

The Italian jazz labels Black Saint and Soul Note have meant a lot for modern jazz history, were recently acquired by Cam Jazz and made a big part of their catalogue available on eMusic. This means that lots of older music, which was really hard to get is now available again : Leo Smith, Archie Shepp, William Parker, Steve Lacy, What We Live, Julius Hemphill, The World Saxophone Quartet, Andrew Cyrille, Anthony Braxton, Paul Bley, Dewey Redman, Oliver Lake, Andrew Hill, Jemeel Moondoc, John Lindberg, ... but also lots of Italians : Paolo Freso, Furio Di Castro, Gianluigi Trovesi, Enrico Pieranunzi, Tiziano Tononi ... All names of musicians who themselves have changed jazz and the history of music.

The initial Billy Harper record "Black Saint" (1975), with which is all started, is also available for download.

A treasure trove.

As Bill Shoemacher writes on the label's home page : "So, the clarion call – Black Saint & Soul Note Ride Again – is welcomed news for persons for whom jazz is a burning passion."

Go to eMusic : select label and check under Black Saint and Soul Note.


© stef

3 comments:

CraigM said...

This is amazing (and would destroy my bank account were it not for my policy of downloading only as much as I can listen to...)

I went to eMusic specifically because they had Clean Feed as well as a couple of local labels (Rastascan and Balance Point Acoustics) that I like to support. I don't know how big a demographic free jazz represents, but they're certainly doing their part to keep us happy.

stef said...

I couldn't agree more.

I had urged eMusic in various of their customer satisfaction surveys to pay more attention to avant-garde and modern jazz, and they are surely making an effort.

I think they should also add CIMP to their catalogue. It's on iTunes, so why not on eMusic?

stef

Anonymous said...

This is sad.I hate downloading music.Never have,never will.It trivializes the art.Maybe this is why vinyl is enjoying a resurgence.

Bill